National Rules on Specialisation

December 8th, 2015 § 0 comments

Specialization drawing

In order to develop a better understanding of how lawyers’ specialisation works throughout the European Union the CCBE has been collecting information about specialisation regimes in 44 European jurisdictions from its CCBE members.

Most European jurisdictions (34) do not have a specific specialisation regime, however lawyers can often indicate their preferred areas of practice. 10 jurisdictions have a specialisation regime: Belgium (OBFG), Croatia, France, Germany, Italy, Portugal, Slovenia, Switzerland, the United Kingdom (solicitors in both England and Wales, and Scotland). Such jurisdictions tend to have precise rules regulating the bestowing and use of a specialist’s title, usually including minimum prior practice in the field, theoretical expertise, and obligations of continuing training.

The number of specialisation fields varies, but it usually is around 20. Across all the jurisdictions surveyed, the most common fields for specialisation are: family law, criminal law, commercial law, labour law, social law, intellectual property law, tax law, IT law, banking law, administrative/public law, and the law of insurance.

The local Regional Chamber of Legal Advisers of Katowice in Poland will be holding a Workshop on Lawyers’ Specialisation on 15 April 2016 in Katowice. Experts from across Europe will participate in this workshop to discuss the pros and cons of introducing Lawyers’ Specialisation and exchanging experiences.

Further information: 

Comparative Note on national regimes of specialisation

National rules of specialisation

Workshop on Lawyers’ Specialisation, Katowice

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