Obstacles to EU citizens’ freedom to move and work in the Internal Market

March 17th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

On 15 March 2017, the European Parliament adopted a Resolution on ‘Obstacles to EU citizens’ freedom to move and work in the Internal Market’ (which can be downloaded here). Concerning professional qualifications and continuous professional development, it states that the Parliament:

17.  Is concerned about the difficulties encountered by petitioners in getting their professional qualifications recognised across Europe; calls for further standardisation of academic titles and continuous education diplomas by Member States, systemic use of the Internal Market Information System (IMI) to ensure better administrative cooperation and simpler and faster procedures for the recognition of professional qualifications and of continuous professional development requirements needed by qualified professionals planning to work in another Member State, avoiding any kind of discrimination, in line with the settled case-law of the Court of Justice, while respecting the requirements of the host country in full compliance with Directive 2005/36/EC on the recognition of professional qualifications;

Concerns about getting professional qualifications recognised across Europe

March 9th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

The European Parliament Committee on Petitions will put a ‘Motion for a resolution on obstacles to EU citizens’ freedom to move and work in the internal market‘ to the next Plenary Session which will take place on 13-16 March 2017.

Amongst others, the Motion states that the Parliament:

17.  Is concerned about the difficulties encountered by petitioners in getting their professional qualifications recognised across Europe; calls for further standardisation of academic titles and continuous education diplomas by Member States, systemic use of the Internal Market Information System (IMI) to ensure better administrative cooperation and simpler and faster procedures for the recognition of professional qualifications and of continuous professional development requirements needed by qualified professionals planning to work in another Member State, avoiding any kind of discrimination, in line with the settled case-law of the Court of Justice, while respecting the requirements of the host country in full compliance with Directive 2005/36/EC on the recognition of professional qualifications;

Cross Border Continuing Professional Development

March 3rd, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

capture

On the ocassion of last week’s meetings in Vienna, 40 Bars and Law Societies signed the CCBE Memorandum on Mutual Recognition of Lawyers’ Cross Border Continuing Professional Development. Please click here to access the Memorandum in English and French and the list of signatory Bars and Law Societies.

The aim of the Memorandum is to promote and facilitate the free movement of lawyers within CCBE member countries where Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is mandatory or recommended. The MOU does not suggest any change to existing CPD standards of quality. By signing the Memorandum, the signatory Bars and Law Societies have agreed that: The number of CPD course hours attended or CPD credits of the training courses obtained by lawyers enrolled in a Bar or Law Society of a member country, should be considered in their signatory jurisdiction of origin to help fulfil their requirements of CPD obligations, in accordance with national, regional or local rules or regulations and without prejudice to each national, regional or local evaluation system.”

epk_057

Signatory Bars and Law Societies

Update on national continuous training rules

May 23rd, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

Capture

CaptureII

In 2015/2016, the CCBE updated its information on national continuous training rules, which were first gathered in 2011.

19 CCBE full member countries have a specific mandatory continuous training regime. In most of these countries, it has been introduced in the past 15 years.

12 full member countries have no specific mandatory continuous training regime; however, in all of these countries various continuous training opportunities exist.

In most countries, the extent of the training obligation is counted in hours, credits or points, though in some in events and days. The average extent of the training obligation is approximately 14 hours/points/credits annually, ranging from four academic hours in Bulgaria to 20 hours in France. In most countries, foreign training activities are recognised. The majority of member countries have opted for “regular control” which means that lawyers are obliged to submit a record of their training activities to the Bar/Law Society on an annual basis. In some member countries, compliance is exclusively monitored via “random control” which means that only a certain number of lawyers/law firms are checked. There are also member countries in which both “regular control” and “random control” are carried out.

The CCBE has prepared a brief layout and a summary detailing the regimes’ specificities by using the following categories: extent of training; activities (courses, language courses, teaching, writing/publishing, other); recognition of foreign training activities; availability of e-methods; provider (bar/law society, accredited providers, free market providers); supervision (regular and/or random control); and sanctions (non-disciplinary and/or disciplinary).

All relevant information on the national rules – including country overviews – can be found here.

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing the Continuous Training category at Training Portal.