The training of lawyers in the 21st century

January 30th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

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Jarkko Männistö, Asianajaja presenting his paper in Brussels at the CCNE Training conference on 14th December 2017

Jarkko Männistö, Asianajaja presenting his paper in Brussels at the CCBE Training conference on 14th December 2017

This is a short blog by Jarkko Männistö, Asianajaja, OTT outlining key points from his intervention at the CCBE conference on Training of Lawyers, challenges and opportunities, Brussels, 14 December 2017.

I have been teaching advocacy to students, bar exam candidates, and experienced attorneys for almost 15 years. What I have learned, through a series of trials and errors, is that students learn what they want to learn. And only what they want to learn.

Based on this experience I argue that continuing legal education in the 21st century should, above all, be a positive experience to those we wish to educate.

The following are, what I consider, the four cornerstones of the positive learning experience.

Go online, go live
Lawyers are chronically time constrained. So take legal education online whenever you can. If a lawyer can save an hour or two of travel time, he or she just might spend a good part of the time saved learning something new.

If you want to lecture, broadcast it live. Livestream lecture with a real time chat is a great way on engaging students from the comfort of their own office or home.

Show, don’t tell
Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach. If you do not agree with this, show your students how it’s done. It’s easy enough to say that you should write clearly and concisely. Following that instruction is the hard part.

Lawyers must apply law to concrete problems. Continuing legal education should help them do that, which is why continuing legal education should be all about application.

Doing is learning
Sitting still and listening someone talk about the law is, even for most lawyers, dreadfully boring. Don’t put your students’ brain into hibernation.

Instead, activate your students. Ask questions. Create problems. Make them do the work, because that’s what learning requires. Hard work. Doing stuff with your brain. Not having it done for you by someone else (the teacher).

Be a coach
People avoid things which cause them embarrasment. Never make people feel bad about themselves, because most of them will not study harder to avoid further embarrasment. Instead, they will take the easy way out, which is to avoid your lectures.

So, accept everyone come in “as is”. You have succeeded as a teacher, if they leave equipped with more knowledge than they came in. And more importantly, with a hunger to learn more.

Jarkko Männistö
Attorney, LL.D.

This posting is an adaptation of the speech Jarkko gave on 14 December in Brussels in the CCBE Seminar titled “Training of lawyers, challenges and opportunities”.

Jarkko

Jarkko

Outcome of the CCBE Training conference

January 12th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

tc-conference

The CCBE Training conference took place on 14 December 2017 in Brussels at the L42 Business Centre (Rue de la Loi 42, 1040, Brussels).

The programme included panels on the transforming management of the law firm in the digital era, neuroscience and new discoveries on effective learning, innovative training tools such as MOOC, virtual reality, webinar, and finally guides to financing projects. Furthermore, the conference provided an introduction to the European Training Platform on the e-Justice portal, and represented a valuable opportunity for training providers and legal professionals to share best practices and innovative solutions for legal training.

Please find the available presentations of the speakers for the conference:

CCBE Training Conference Programme

CCBE Training Conference Presentation

Workshop 1a – Design thinking and legal design

Workshop 1b – EU funds for training of lawyers

Workshop 2 – Choosing the appropriate, innovative tools for training

Workshop 3 – Council of Europe: HELP in the EU

Report on European judicial training 2017

January 11th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

On December 14, 2017 during the CCBE Training conference the European Commission presented the Report on European Judicial Training 2017.

This is the sixth report on training for legal practitioners (judges, prosecutors, court staff, bailiffs, lawyers and notaries) on EU law or on the national law of another Member State.

It is based on the results of a questionnaire sent in 2017 to Member States’ authorities, European networks of legal professionals (including the CCBE) and the main training providers at European level.

The report describes the progress towards the target set by the European Commission in 2011 (Communication “Building trust in EU-wide justice. A new dimension to European judicial training”) of ensuring that half of all legal practitioners in the EU are trained on EU law or on the national law of another Member State by 2020.

The discussion of the report will be organised during the CCBE Training Committee meeting on February 7, 2018 in Vienna.

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Legal English & Legal Skills – summer Course 2018!

January 9th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

 

For the past four years, the Law Society of Ireland has organised a (summer) Legal English and Legal Skills course for foreign lawyers.

The course consists of one intensive week in Dublin (in July), where participants can develop their legal skills (presentation, interviewing, negotiation & drafting) in English. The programme includes a lecture on comparative legal ethics. It is also a good opportunity to see Ireland and meet colleagues from other jurisdictions.

The 2018 course will take place from 16 to 20 July.

Legal English Brochure 2018